Probationary Period

TIP OF THE DAY – PROBATIONARY PERIOD FOR NEW HIRES

Many employers question the need for a probationary period for new hires, since Florida is an “employment at will” state.

One good reason to establish a 90-day probationary period is to protect the company from rate increases caused by unnecessary unemployment claims. “Employment at will” means that you can discharge an employee at any time with or without good cause, as long as you don’t run afoul of federal or state discrimination laws and whistleblower protections. However, employees who are terminated for legitimate business reasons where no employee misconduct is involved do qualify for unemployment compensation benefits. The exception to this is termination of employment during an established, initial 90-day probationary period that the employee was advised of at the time of hire.

Have new employees sign an acknowledgement that they are subject to a 90-day probationary period and will not become regular employees until the period is completed. This protects your company from rate increases resulting from unemployment compensation benefits paid to newly-hired employees who simply were not a good fit, or were let go for unsatisfactory performance in the first 90 days.

TIP OF THE DAY – PROBATIONARY PERIOD FOR NEW HIRES

Many employers question the need for a probationary period for new hires, since Florida is an “employment at will” state.

One good reason to establish a 90-day probationary period is to protect the company from rate increases caused by unnecessary unemployment claims. “Employment at will” means that you can discharge an employee at any time with or without good cause, as long as you don’t run afoul of federal or state discrimination laws and whistleblower protections. However, employees who are terminated for legitimate business reasons where no employee misconduct is involved do qualify for unemployment compensation benefits. The exception to this is termination of employment during an established, initial 90-day probationary period that the employee was advised of at the time of hire.

Have new employees sign an acknowledgement that they are subject to a 90-day probationary period and will not become regular employees until the period is completed. This protects your company from rate increases resulting from unemployment compensation benefits paid to newly-hired employees who simply were not a good fit, or were let go for unsatisfactory performance in the first 90 days.